09: Elder Scrolls and Ancestor Moths

We (finally) approach the strange and mysterious topic that everybody has been asking about (for three-and-a-half seasons). We don’t know much about them, but I’ve tried my best to compile all of the available knowledge without providing any spoilers. We also talk briefly about the Order of the Ancestor Moth. The monks of the Ancestor Moths are, by time-honored tradition, the only people allowed to view the Elder Scrolls.

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2 responses to “09: Elder Scrolls and Ancestor Moths

  1. It has always seemed to me that the Elder Scrolls were manifestations of the rules-based, simulationist foundation of the universe. In other words, the Elder Scrolls are a bleeding-through into the perceptions of the inhabitants of Nirn of the computer code that brings their universe into being. The scrolls exist out of time, are innumerate, and are of intense complexity, just as the whole sum of all the lines of code making up all of the past, current, and future Elder Scrolls games are innumerate and of intense complexity, unreadable except with years of scholarship. The blindness that results from increasing understanding of the scrolls’ contents is a feedback effect – as beings created by the scrolls crudely “re-run” the software of the scrolls in their minds, the feedback destroys their senses.

    A number of metaphysical writings in the Elder Scrolls games suggest that at least a few philosophers have figured out that their lives and experiences are taking place within a universe that is an artifact of electronic simulation, and they attempt to describe it in mechanical terms, because clockwork is the only available metaphor they have.

    I’ve always assumed that the rationalist Dwemer were tempermentally suited to understand their universe as a simulation, and they dabbled in modifying the operational code of existence. Their racial tragedy came in thinking that they could somehow step outside the boundaries of the software that defined their being.

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